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2007

This document describes the National Center for School Engagement's 21 ways to engage students in school. It also describes best practices for improving student attendance, achievement, and attachment.

This article By Joshua Mandel, Psy.D. of the NYU Child Study Center discusses the socail lives of adolescents from a psyhological point of view. It offers educators and parents information to help adolescents navigate bullies, cliques and other challenges. 

Creating a culture of inclusion and respect helps keep most students on track to academic success. This stragey may include the following:

  • Strategic classrooms where inclusive instructional strategies are aligned with individual needs of ALL learners (English Language Learners, Special Ed, and advanced)

This website features a course designed to provide educators with skills and techniques to manage and reduce conflict in schoolsl. It has tools that will:

"Enhance  understanding of ways to manage and resolve conflicts effectively in school settings, improve the emotional climate in the school, and help you and other educators spend more time teaching."

This booklet attempts to briefly summarize the research on strategies or experiments to increase attendance. It presents some research-based ideas as a starting place for those who want to develop better policies and practices for attendance and to understand the factors that contribute to increased attendance, engagement, and a lower dropout rate.

This case study is a dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership, School Counseling, and Sports Management in partial fulfillment for the degree of Doctor of Educational Leadership University of North Florida College of Education.

The theory of Multiple Intelligences explains that there are different ways to demonstrate intellectual ability. Because different students possess different intelligences, students process information in a variety of ways. It is the responsibility of a teacher to make sure that activities are designed with these different learners in mind.

When a student breaks a rule and we implement a consequence, whether we realize it or not, we may be attacking his/her dignity. We must keep the mindset that our students do well if they can, and when they can’t it is because of a lagging skill coupled with an unresolved problem that needs to be solved so he/she can thrive.

This guide helps organizations assess the extent to which the factors associated with effective professional learning communities (critical elements, human resources, structural conditions) are present at their organizations to determine if they are true professional learning communities, anxious organizations, or somewhere in the middle.

An article describing how one school’s use of data, small learning communities, and a focus on advisory helped ensure that, Omarina Cabrera, a Bronx middle grade student whose family struggles threatened to distract her from school, did not fall off the track to success.

This paper summarizes five developmental characteristics of young adolescents and their implications for practice in schooling: physical, intellectual, emotional/psychological, moral/ethical, and social developmental characteristics. Practitioners, parents, and others who work with young adolescents need to be aware of any changes—subtle or obvious—in these developmental characteristics.

This report by details the efforts undertaken by the task force to combat chronic absenteeism in New York City between 2010 and 2013. It examines the extent and nature of chronic absenteeism in New York City in schools with above average rates of chronic absenteeism. It investigates the impact of entering and exiting chronic absenteeism on academic outcomes.

A tool/handout to provide sentence starters and stems to help students practice accountable talk in the classroom.

This checklist on "Accountable Talk" observes teachers and students' interactions through talking and listening.

Productive classroom communities that demonstrate good behavior are developed, they do not happen on their own. Expect to deal with maladaptive behaviors, especially in the first weeks of school. This resource provides teachers with a suggested approach to discipline during the first few weeks of school.