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This paper summarizes five developmental characteristics of young adolescents and their implications for practice in schooling: physical, intellectual, emotional/psychological, moral/ethical, and social developmental characteristics. Practitioners, parents, and others who work with young adolescents need to be aware of any changes—subtle or obvious—in these developmental characteristics.

This news article discusses the research of Dr. Jay Giedd, chief of brain imaging in the child psychiatry branch at the National Institute of Mental Health, to determine how the brain develops from childhood into adolescence and on into early adulthood.

This guide is divided into three sections. The first section outlines the developmental characteristics (the intellectual, social, physical, emotional and psychological, and moral characteristics) of young adolescents Turning Points schools seek to address.

January 30, 2008

This powerpoint presentation describes the following three stepts to reducing dropouts: 1) understand the dropout problem in your community, 2) build an early  warning, prevention, and intervention system, 3) involve the community.

Solving problems and responding to life’s demands requires thinking skills. If a child doesn’t have the skills to handle a problem or expectation adaptively, the result will likely be some form of maladaptive or challenging behavior.

March 2006

While some students drop out because of significant academic challenges, most dropouts are students who could have, and believe they could have, succeeded in school.

In this paper, the authors propose a model of the prosocial classroom that highlights the importance of teachers’ social and emotional competence (SEC) and well-being in the development and maintenance of supportive teacher-student relationships, effective classroom management, and successful social and emotional learning (SEL) program implementation.

This report summarizes results from three large-scale reviews of research on the impact of social and emotional learning (SEL) programs on elementary and middle-school students. Results found that SEL programs yielded multiple benefits and were effective in both school and after-school settings and for students with and without behavioral and emotional problems.

December 2013

This report is the first-of-its-kind research that aims to measure positive youth development through a multi-year study of students participating in 4-H out-of-school activities. The result is a model that is driving new thinking and approaches to youth development around the world.

Education is changing. Academic learning and SEL are becoming the new standard for what are considered the basics that children should acquire during their schooling. This chapter outlines ideas to help get social-emotional efforts started as well as to sustain those that have already begun.

Productive classroom communities that demonstrate good behavior are developed, they do not happen on their own. Expect to deal with maladaptive behaviors, especially in the first weeks of school. This resource provides teachers with a suggested approach to discipline during the first few weeks of school.

Individualized interventions created with and for students may include:

This template helps schools identify the necessary structures and supports for educating adolescents across six dimensions: school practices & structures, physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral.

This tool helps schools identify the key characteristics across five adolescent developmental areas (social, emotional, physical, cognitive, and moral) and brainstorm how they can adapt practices to best meet the needs of their students.

Research-proven Social Emotional Learning (SEL) programs