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November 2006

This supplement to the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice presents and discusses youth development approaches in the context of public health programs. The overarching purpose of the supplement is to acquaint public health practitioners with the basic concepts of youth development and to provide guidance about how to put them into practice.

November 2006

This article discusses the similarities and differences between youth development and public health strategies, and provides insights in sharing best practices across the two areas.

This paper summarizes five developmental characteristics of young adolescents and their implications for practice in schooling: physical, intellectual, emotional/psychological, moral/ethical, and social developmental characteristics. Practitioners, parents, and others who work with young adolescents need to be aware of any changes—subtle or obvious—in these developmental characteristics.

This analysis revealed that chronic absence is a significant issue in Oregon, dragging down academic performance, for communities and students of all demographic backgrounds, but especially those in families living in poverty.The good news is that this research also shows that chronic absence is a solvable problem.

A report that examines the reearch-based effectiveness of Read 180® as a literacy intervention program. The report states that no studies of READ 180 that fall within the scope of the Adolescent Literacy (AL) review protocol meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) evidence standards, but seven studies meet WWC evidence standards with reservations.

July 2007

In this report, we look closely at students’ performance in their coursework during their freshman year, how it is related to eventual graduation, and how personal and school factors contribute to success or failure in freshman-year courses in Chicago public high schools.

This news article discusses the research of Dr. Jay Giedd, chief of brain imaging in the child psychiatry branch at the National Institute of Mental Health, to determine how the brain develops from childhood into adolescence and on into early adulthood.

This article looks at the effect of school infrastructure on student attendance and drop-out rates. The study finds that the quality of school infrastructure has a significant effect on school attendance and drop-out rates. Students are less likely to attend schools in need of structural repair, schools that use temporary structures, and schools that have understaffed janitorial services.

In this paper, the authors propose a model of the prosocial classroom that highlights the importance of teachers’ social and emotional competence (SEC) and well-being in the development and maintenance of supportive teacher-student relationships, effective classroom management, and successful social and emotional learning (SEL) program implementation.

This report summarizes results from three large-scale reviews of research on the impact of social and emotional learning (SEL) programs on elementary and middle-school students. Results found that SEL programs yielded multiple benefits and were effective in both school and after-school settings and for students with and without behavioral and emotional problems.

December 2013

This report is the first-of-its-kind research that aims to measure positive youth development through a multi-year study of students participating in 4-H out-of-school activities. The result is a model that is driving new thinking and approaches to youth development around the world.

December 2013

This report is the first-of-its-kind research that aims to measure positive youth development through a multi-year study of students participating in 4-H out-of-school activities. The result is a model that is driving new thinking and approaches to youth development around the world.

1999

This article discusses the use of strength-based over deficit-based approaches to address issues of youth and community development. This approach focuses on “developing that which is desired rather than preventing or treating that which is undesired—the deficit.” The article examines three main issues for evaluating strength-based approaches.

This report to the Carnegie Corporation of New York comes out of a meeting of a panel of five nationally known and respected educational researchers, with representatives of Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Alliance for Excellent Education, in spring 2004.

September 9, 2005

This paper presents the conceptual foundations of the positive youth development (PYD) perspective by reviewing the history of theories about adolescent development and by specifying the key theoretical ideas defining the PYD perspective. In turn, the paper discusses the burgeoning empirical work being done to define the bases and features of the positive development of diverse youth.