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This analysis revealed that chronic absence is a significant issue in Oregon, dragging down academic performance, for communities and students of all demographic backgrounds, but especially those in families living in poverty.The good news is that this research also shows that chronic absence is a solvable problem. While many schools are struggling with high levels of chronic absence, the research also identified schools that are beating the odds by maintaining higher than expected attendance rates despite serving high risk populations.

January 30, 2008

This powerpoint presentation describes the following three stepts to reducing dropouts: 1) understand the dropout problem in your community, 2) build an early  warning, prevention, and intervention system, 3) involve the community.

In this longitudinal study, data were collected on schools’ rates of daily student attendance and chronic absenteeism and on specific partnership practices that were implemented to help increase or sustain student attendance. Results indicate that several family–school–community partnership practices predict an increase in daily attendance, a decrease in chronic absenteeism, or both.

FHI 360 is collaborating with the Caribbean HIV/AIDS Alliance (CHAA) to develop and implement a targeted social media strategy for the Eastern Caribbean Community Action Project II (EC-CAP II). 

This report by details the efforts undertaken by the task force to combat chronic absenteeism in New York City between 2010 and 2013. It examines the extent and nature of chronic absenteeism in New York City in schools with above average rates of chronic absenteeism. It investigates the impact of entering and exiting chronic absenteeism on academic outcomes. Finally, it examines the impact of the task force’s chronic absenteeism prevention and intervention programs on reducing chronic absenteeism and increasing school attendance – and what that means for other cities.

2012

This report offers a first school-level look at how early warning systems are being implemented. The research team visited middle and high schools in cities across the country to observe how they are using EWIs to monitor and respond to student needs.

September 2010

This Early Warning System (EWS) Implementation Guide is a supporting document for schools and districts that are implementing the National High School Center’s Early Warning System (EWS) Tool v2.0.

This guide is intended to be useful to high schools and middle schools in planning and executing dropout prevention strategies. This guide is to help educators and policy makers develop practice and policy alternatives and it includes specific recommendations (and indicates the quality of the evidence that supports these recommendations).

July 2008

This guide, intended for educators and policymakers at the school, district, and state levels, is designed to provide information about the following: factors that contribute to a student’s dropping out, research on early warning indicators, school and district-level early warning systems, and states’ roles in supporting early warning systems.

For districts that want to create their own ISIS data reports using Excel, but need help creating condition formatting to color code student status in each of the indicator areas.

An article describing how one school’s use of data, small learning communities, and a focus on advisory helped ensure that, Omarina Cabrera, a Bronx middle grade student whose family struggles threatened to distract her from school, did not fall off the track to success.

August 2009

The researchers created a middle level school-based model designed to keep students on track and prepare them for high school. They have learned that it is possible to create a multi-tiered school improvement and intervention model in middle grades schools in high-poverty neighborhoods where large numbers of students need a range of supports to stay on track. The following are key components of the Early Warning Systems model.