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January 30, 2008

This powerpoint presentation describes the following three stepts to reducing dropouts: 1) understand the dropout problem in your community, 2) build an early  warning, prevention, and intervention system, 3) involve the community.

National research has established that students who are chronically absent as early as kindergarten have lower achievement in later grades. To demonstrate that connection in New York City schools, the Campaign for Fiscal Equity reviewed the attendance records, state assessment scores and various demographic factors for fourth-graders attending New York City public schools in the 2007-08 school year. The study considered attendance in both third and fourth grades, and analyzed
other school and student factors that can weigh heavily on academic performance.

This report by details the efforts undertaken by the task force to combat chronic absenteeism in New York City between 2010 and 2013. It examines the extent and nature of chronic absenteeism in New York City in schools with above average rates of chronic absenteeism. It investigates the impact of entering and exiting chronic absenteeism on academic outcomes. Finally, it examines the impact of the task force’s chronic absenteeism prevention and intervention programs on reducing chronic absenteeism and increasing school attendance – and what that means for other cities.

2012

This report offers a first school-level look at how early warning systems are being implemented. The research team visited middle and high schools in cities across the country to observe how they are using EWIs to monitor and respond to student needs.

September 2010

This Early Warning System (EWS) Implementation Guide is a supporting document for schools and districts that are implementing the National High School Center’s Early Warning System (EWS) Tool v2.0.

2014

This study describes how teachers and school leaders at the High School of Telecommunication Arts and Technology (familiarly known as Telly) used data and design to strengthen programming for students in grades 9 and 10, thereby improving outcomes for all students. 

While chronic absence is not a problem everywhere, it can reach surprisingly high levels even in the early grades. Although teachers take roll every day, most schools currently do not use their data to monitor if they have a problem with chronic absence. This study confirms the premise that districts and schools may fail to detect high levels of chronic absence because the problem is easily masked by average daily attendance.

An article describing how one school’s use of data, small learning communities, and a focus on advisory helped ensure that, Omarina Cabrera, a Bronx middle grade student whose family struggles threatened to distract her from school, did not fall off the track to success.

One of the first articles describing the early warning indicator research conducted by a team from Johns Hopkins University and the Philadelphia Education Fund. This research found that 80 percent of the students who dropped out of high school had sent a distress signal in the middle grades or during the first year of high school, and these “early warning signals” are failing grades in English and math, poor behavior, and poor attendance. These data serve as an early warning system to flag at-risk students and intervene to keep them on the path to graduation. 

August 2009

The researchers created a middle level school-based model designed to keep students on track and prepare them for high school. They have learned that it is possible to create a multi-tiered school improvement and intervention model in middle grades schools in high-poverty neighborhoods where large numbers of students need a range of supports to stay on track. The following are key components of the Early Warning Systems model.