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2007

This document describes the National Center for School Engagement's 21 ways to engage students in school. It also describes best practices for improving student attendance, achievement, and attachment.

This protocol prompts teachers in thinking deeply about a specific lesson that they will be teaching based on a cognitively challenging mathematical task.

This Executive Summary to a report on The Importance of Being in School: A Report on Absenteeism in the Nation's Public Schools looks at data from six states on their measures of chronic absenteeism: Georgia, Florida, Maryland, Nebraska, Oregon and Rhode Island. The states reported chronic absentee rates from 6 percent to 23 percent, with chronic absenteeism most prevalent in urban areas, among low-income students, and concentrated in relatively few schools.Chronic absenteeism begins to rise in middle school and continues climbing through 12th grade.

National research has established that students who are chronically absent as early as kindergarten have lower achievement in later grades. To demonstrate that connection in New York City schools, the Campaign for Fiscal Equity reviewed the attendance records, state assessment scores and various demographic factors for fourth-graders attending New York City public schools in the 2007-08 school year. The study considered attendance in both third and fourth grades, and analyzed
other school and student factors that can weigh heavily on academic performance.

2007

This article considers the practical, conceptual, and empirical foundations of an early identification and intervention system for middle-grades schools to combat student disengagement and increase graduation rates in our nation’s cities. Many students in urban schools become disengaged at the start of the middle grades, which greatly reduces the odds that they will eventually graduate.

This report by details the efforts undertaken by the task force to combat chronic absenteeism in New York City between 2010 and 2013. It examines the extent and nature of chronic absenteeism in New York City in schools with above average rates of chronic absenteeism. It investigates the impact of entering and exiting chronic absenteeism on academic outcomes. Finally, it examines the impact of the task force’s chronic absenteeism prevention and intervention programs on reducing chronic absenteeism and increasing school attendance – and what that means for other cities.

2012

This report offers a first school-level look at how early warning systems are being implemented. The research team visited middle and high schools in cities across the country to observe how they are using EWIs to monitor and respond to student needs.

This handout presents instructional alignment as the important part of the teacher’s role to make sure there is alignment between the curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

September 2010

This Early Warning System (EWS) Implementation Guide is a supporting document for schools and districts that are implementing the National High School Center’s Early Warning System (EWS) Tool v2.0.

July 2008

This guide, intended for educators and policymakers at the school, district, and state levels, is designed to provide information about the following: factors that contribute to a student’s dropping out, research on early warning indicators, school and district-level early warning systems, and states’ roles in supporting early warning systems.

2014

This study describes how teachers and school leaders at the High School of Telecommunication Arts and Technology (familiarly known as Telly) used data and design to strengthen programming for students in grades 9 and 10, thereby improving outcomes for all students. 

This report takes a look at the role that attendance may play as a predictor of student success. Analyses were conducted to investigate the following
questions: 1) How does attendance in early grades (kindergarten and first grade) relate to third grade performance? 2) Does the association between attendance and later outcomes depend on the readiness skills that students possess when they enter kindergarten?

This report describes the characteristics of school dropouts and discusses the use of an Early Warning System using attendance, behavior, and course grades data to predict dropouts and provide them with targeted interventions.

One of the first articles describing the early warning indicator research conducted by a team from Johns Hopkins University and the Philadelphia Education Fund. This research found that 80 percent of the students who dropped out of high school had sent a distress signal in the middle grades or during the first year of high school, and these “early warning signals” are failing grades in English and math, poor behavior, and poor attendance. These data serve as an early warning system to flag at-risk students and intervene to keep them on the path to graduation. 

August 2009

The researchers created a middle level school-based model designed to keep students on track and prepare them for high school. They have learned that it is possible to create a multi-tiered school improvement and intervention model in middle grades schools in high-poverty neighborhoods where large numbers of students need a range of supports to stay on track. The following are key components of the Early Warning Systems model.