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2007

This document describes the National Center for School Engagement's 21 ways to engage students in school. It also describes best practices for improving student attendance, achievement, and attachment.

This paper summarizes five developmental characteristics of young adolescents and their implications for practice in schooling: physical, intellectual, emotional/psychological, moral/ethical, and social developmental characteristics. Practitioners, parents, and others who work with young adolescents need to be aware of any changes—subtle or obvious—in these developmental characteristics.

This research-based program for middle school students is designed to teach academic vocabulary in language arts, math, science, and social studies classes and build the reasoning and argumentation skills that are necessary for learning in all content areas.

A report that examines the reearch-based effectiveness of Read 180® as a literacy intervention program. The report states that no studies of READ 180 that fall within the scope of the Adolescent Literacy (AL) review protocol meet What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) evidence standards, but seven studies meet WWC evidence standards with reservations. The seven studies included 10,638 students, ranging from grade 4 to grade 9, who attended elementary, middle, and high schools in Arizona, California, Florida, New York, Ohio, Texas, and Virginia.

This article derives several distinguishing qualities of rigor from an examination of rigor in both academic and nonschool learning and work among students in Big Picture schools. The Big Picture is a school reform design committed to providing quality education for underserved urban students. Truly rigorous learning in schools would revitalize the prevailing paradigm of teaching and learning, a paradigm largely devoid of student engagement that often leaves the practical, creative, and analytic intelligences languishing.

This checklist and step-by-step instruction helps teachers and school administrators plan rigorous and relevant classroom instruction.

This guide is divided into three sections. The first section outlines the developmental characteristics (the intellectual, social, physical, emotional and psychological, and moral characteristics) of young adolescents Turning Points schools seek to address. The second section addresses the implications these characteristics hold for teaching and learning by suggesting six areas Turning Points schools engage in to respond to the unique needs of young adolescent learners:

This protocol prompts teachers in thinking deeply about a specific lesson that they will be teaching based on a cognitively challenging mathematical task.

In this paper, the authors propose a model of the prosocial classroom that highlights the importance of teachers’ social and emotional competence (SEC) and well-being in the development and maintenance of supportive teacher-student relationships, effective classroom management, and successful social and emotional learning (SEL) program implementation. This model proposes that these factors contribute to creating a classroom climate that is more conducive to learning that promotes positive developmental outcomes among students.

December 2013

This report is the first-of-its-kind research that aims to measure positive youth development through a multi-year study of students participating in 4-H out-of-school activities. The result is a model that is driving new thinking and approaches to youth development around the world.

December 2013

This report is the first-of-its-kind research that aims to measure positive youth development through a multi-year study of students participating in 4-H out-of-school activities. The result is a model that is driving new thinking and approaches to youth development around the world.

This article discusses the importance of reading and the need to teach individuals how to become better readers.

This Executive Summary to a report on The Importance of Being in School: A Report on Absenteeism in the Nation's Public Schools looks at data from six states on their measures of chronic absenteeism: Georgia, Florida, Maryland, Nebraska, Oregon and Rhode Island. The states reported chronic absentee rates from 6 percent to 23 percent, with chronic absenteeism most prevalent in urban areas, among low-income students, and concentrated in relatively few schools.Chronic absenteeism begins to rise in middle school and continues climbing through 12th grade.

Education is changing. Academic learning and SEL are becoming the new standard for what are considered the basics that children should acquire during their schooling. This chapter outlines ideas to help get social-emotional efforts started as well as to sustain those that have already begun. It identifies eight elements necessary for the kind of academic-social-emotional balance that will lead students to success in school and life: